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What's True and What's Not? 10 COVID-19 Myths Busted by Science (Part 2)

Everyone wants to be informed about the latest happenings especially news about the coronavirus pandemic. We want to know the numbers of infected people, the recoveries, deaths, news about the vaccine, and many more. But we should also be careful and mindful of the articles we see online.

Karen Cruz
Karen Cruz

Everyone wants to be informed about the latest happenings especially news about the coronavirus pandemic. We want to know the numbers of infected people, the recoveries, deaths, news about the vaccine, and many more. But we should also be careful and mindful of the articles we see online. Most are facts, but some are only myths and conspiracy theories about the pandemic. Last time we already uncovered some rumors and facts about the novel coronavirus. Today, we will talk about more myths and find out the truth. What is true? What is not?

Myth: Coronavirus can be caught from urine and feces.

Fact: When we swallow, we can swallow mucus from our upper respiratory tract, which pushes bacteria and viruses down into our gut. In there, the bacteria and viruses are denatured in our stomach's acid conditions. These viruses, which are not infectious to others because they are already destroyed by our guts, can be detected in our feces. Again, the virus in our feces is not infectious but it is still worth noting that viruses similar to SARS-CoV-2 might be present in feces.

Myth: COVID-19 will die in high temperatures.

Fact: Viruses like the flu and cold viruses can spread more easily in cold weather. However, high temperatures do not stop viruses entirely from spreading.

Myth: Vaccines for pneumonia and flu can be used to protect against coronavirus.

Fact: No existing vaccines yet that can protect against COVID-19, so flu and pneumonia vaccines cannot be used to protect against the virus.

Myth: COVID-19 was originated in one of China's laboratory.

Fact: There is no evidence that can suggest the novel coronavirus originated in a laboratory in China. Researchers believe that COVID-19 spread from pangolins to humans, or it may have jumped from bats to humans, similar to the case of SARS.

Myth: You can catch COVID-19 in swimming pools.

Fact: While there is no evidence (according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or CDC) to suggest that COVID-19 can spread through the water in swimming pools and water playgrounds, if the water is cleaned and disinfected with chlorine and bromine, it can inactivate the virus. However, it will much safer if we avoid going to public areas because we can still catch the virus from other people. COVID-19 can spread through inhaling respiratory droplets in the air and when it came into contact with surfaces.

Myth: You can protect yourself from the virus by eating garlic and drinking alcohol.

Fact: Eating garlic and drinking alcohol will not protect you against COVID-19. Yes, alcohol-based sanitizers can be used to disinfect your skin but according to the World Health Organization (WHO), drinking alcohol cannot disinfect your body when it is ingested. Too much consumption of alcohol can actually weaken your immune system and lessen the ability of your body to cope with infectious diseases.

Myth: Drinking hot beverages and warm water can stop the novel coronavirus.

Fact: Hot or cold drinks cannot protect you against the virus nor it can cure the disease. Drinking plenty of water, getting enough sleep, eating a balanced diet, and exercising can help you manage your symptoms and make your immune system stronger.

Myth: Wearing a mask can cause carbon dioxide intoxication.

Fact: We know wearing medical or clothing masks can be uncomfortable. However, according to WHO, it does not cause carbon dioxide intoxication or oxygen deficiency even when you are wearing N85 masks. The amount of carbon dioxide that we might rebreathe while wearing a mask is eliminated quickly by respiratory and metabolic systems in our body.

Myth: A saline nose rinse protects against COVID-19.

Fact: There is still no evidence that rinsing your nose with saline can protect you from the virus or any other respiratory infections. This method may be used to lessen the symptoms of acute upper respiratory tract infections but it cannot reduce the risk of infection.

The COVID-19 pandemic continues to threaten people worldwide so it is important to keep yourself informed with only facts about the virus. We hope the clarifications we provided will help you better understand what is happening and cut through the confusion. Just remember to always follow the simple safety measures to reduce the spread of coronavirus.